Innovation

Shrooms-Based Applications Likely to Make a Global Impact

Fungi have been around for about one billion years. But the world has only recently recognized fungi as sustainable energy, medicine, and technology source. 

 

Mushrooms can be grown on waste materials like sawdust, cardboard, or sawdust mixed with paper pulp. They have a fantastic ability to purify water and air and can even be used to produce electricity.

 

Check out two of the most promising new fungi-based applications poised to make a global impact. 

Fungi in Agriculture

When you look at plants, you’re also looking at fungi. Why? Many terrestrial plants have thread-like fungi between their cells that feast on plant-made sugar. In return, the fungi help these plants withstand stressful environmental conditions such as high temperatures and drought. 

When you expose a plant to drought, it will suffer from oxidative stress. It’s a condition of antioxidant and free radical imbalance hurting its cells. Unlike humans, plants can’t produce chemicals to counter stress and its effects. But the fungi inside the plants’ cells can deal with stress. 

 

These thin threads send an arsenal of oxidative stress-calming compounds. Aside from that, they also help plants use water. It allows plants to deal with drought and extreme salt and heat exposure effects. 

 

Studies reveal that you can move these stress-reducing fungi from the host plant to other crops. As a result, it’ll be easy for them to survive the warming planet. A fungus can help grow panic grass in soil with temperatures of 65°C and higher. They can also let tomatoes grow in similar conditions.  

 

Combining Shrooms and Hemp

Austrian company Deep Nature Project, a manufacturer of organic hemp and vital products, carries a robust line of supplements in its catalog. These supplements combine the high-quality active compounds of vital mushrooms and hemp.

DNP’s products function in various applications such as:

  • Health and wellness
  • Mental and physical performance
  • Immunity

Combining mushrooms and cannabis offer many powerful benefits, including:

  • Mood improvement
  • Anxiety relief
  • Memory and focus boost
  • New brain cell growth
  • Immunity enhancement

Fungi and Mental Health Treatments 

Interest and awareness of mental health continue to increase. Researchers have also discovered that fungi may play a role in treating mental illnesses.

Researchers found that mushrooms can treat anxiety and depression. Consuming mushrooms reduces stress by acting on the same pathways as benzodiazepines or tranquilizers, but without the risk of addiction. Mushrooms affect the brain’s neurotransmitters that control mood, memory, motor control, and coordination.

 

Psilocybin, the hallucinogenic blend found in magic mushrooms, is also effective at treating depression and anxiety in patients with cancer.

Bright Future for Mushroom and Its Derivatives

People may have underrated the benefits and usage of mushrooms. Fortunately, recent breakthroughs in agriculture, medicine, and other industries have given mushrooms a promising future. It’s no longer seen as a mere source of psilocybin and other mind-altering substances. 

Scientists agree mushrooms can stabilize the global food supply despite the increasingly warming climate. 

Meanwhile, the hemp industry may be rebalancing, with farmers agreeing it likely will stay around as a specialty crop like artichokes, gooseberries, nutmeg, and stevia. 

Nonetheless, the sky’s the limit for mushrooms, their derivatives, and hemp altogether as farmers, manufacturers, and traders pursue various ways to reinvent their businesses. One such reinvention takes place in the field of hemp and CBD cigarettes. Industry players have revealed that they are looking forward to gaining more traction in European countries. 

Curious about the much-commended CBD cigarettes? If you want to enjoy their benefits, check out Oklahoma Smokes today. OK, Smokes is a celebrated tobacco- and nicotine-free hemp product from California. Smooth, rich, and potent, but one that doesn’t get you high.

 

Sources

sciencedirect

ncbi

frontiersin

clinicaltrials

sciencefocus

pewtrust

healthline

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